Purchase Article
Account Credit $18.50
Article Cost $0.40
Balance of Credit $18.10
Confirm

The cost of your purchase will exceed your credit of . Click here to be taken to your account to purchase more credit.

Did you know that your version of Internet Explorer is out of date?
To get the best possible experience using our website we recommend downloading one of the browsers below.

Internet Explorer 10, Firefox, Chrome, or Safari.

LIMITED TIME OFFER: Receive 10% off your first credit purchase (Example: Buy a $10 credit but get billed for only $9)!

Advanced Search
Let’s Talk Fracking
Discussing complex energy issues with young people to foster a more sustainable energy future
Back
October 20, 2017
Green Teacher

Originally appears in the Fall 2017 issue

Tar sands oil refinery, Indiana. Photo: Ted Auch

The process of obtaining oil and natural gas is a controversial topic triggering vigorous debates around the globe. Providing energy for Americans through the production of domestic fossil fuel resources was one of the key promises President Trump made to “Make America Great Again” during his run for the White House. Drilling companies have pushed to access natural gas in coal seams in Australia, and in tight shale formations in parts of Europe. Canada’s oil and gas industry survives by exporting most of its products to the United States, with hopes of expanding into overseas markets. Intentionally omitted from discussion of all of these goals, however, are the serious costs associated with extracting and distributing these non-renewable resources.

Can fracking contaminate drinking water? How does energy production change the places we love? What pollutants are being emitted from oil and gas well pads on a daily basis? Will this activity impact my health, or the health of my family? Though seemingly straightforward, these questions are difficult for most people to answer. That’s because oil and gas drilling may not be occurring in their backyards. The oil and gas industry is much broader than oil wells, however. Related infrastructure often generates a large footprint. For example, railroad tankers carry volatile oil and gas products and supplies across sizeable swaths of land. Sand mines are expanding to provide sand for hydraulic fracturing. Refineries and export facilities dominate the skyline in industrial areas. Oil and gas pipelines stretch thousands of miles and thus create a much larger network of risk.


Purchase article to read more - $0.99
Prev
Top Selling Articles
/
View All
Next
Alternatives Journal | Apr 22, 2017

Mi’kmaq-designed and delivered course from Cape Breton U attracts thousands around the world

 
Green Teacher | Apr 28, 2016

A place-based education program that could bring hands-on discovery into K-5 classrooms in your community.

 
Inroads Journal | Nov 19, 2017

Paradoxical election outcome in times of economic prosperity and its implications for Czech democracy and European politics.

 
Green Teacher | Jan 20, 2017

How can students explore new and creative ways of portraying diverse ecosystems, particularly regarding places that most people will never see?

 
Alternatives Journal | Apr 17, 2017

26 years, 26 Noahs. Who’s next?

 
Alternatives Journal | Jun 15, 2017

How farm runoff threatens Lake Erie with unending algal blooms.

Green Teacher | Apr 28, 2016

“As safe as necessary” versus “as safe as possible”: what the research tells us

 
Inroads Journal | Sep 21, 2017

Hearing echoes of populisms past

EcoParent | Apr 15, 2015

Manda Aufochs Gillespie talks about the benefits of designing urban communities that are kid-frendly.

 
EcoParent | Jul 16, 2013

Old and new traditions converge at Tawse Winery’s certified biodynamic vineyard.

 
Green Teacher | Jun 19, 2017

Developing outdoor classrooms at local ski hills to develop minds and bodies

 
Alternatives Journal | Jul 12, 2017

When we focus on employment, equity and environment, quality of life improves- and the people thrive.